Mending Rune of Perfect Order

mending rune of perfect order key item elden ring wiki guide
Type Great Rune
item effects icon elden ring wiki guide 55px 18pxEffect
Can be used to mend the shattered Elden Ring.

Mending Rune of Perfect Order is a Great Rune in Elden Ring. Unlike most other Great Runes, it can't be equipped. Its only effect is to alter the ending of the game.

 

Rune discovered by the noble Goldmask.
Used to restore the fractured Elden Ring when brandished by the Elden Lord.

A rune of transcendental ideology which will attempt to perfect the Golden Order.

The current imperfection of the Golden Order, or instability of ideology, can be blamed upon the fickleness of the gods no better than men. That is the fly in the ointment.

 

Where to find Mending Rune of Perfect Order in Elden Ring

Dropped by Goldmask after following his and Brother Corhyn's questline.

 

Elden Ring Mending Rune of Perfect Order Use

Grants access to an alternative ending after defeating the final boss. See Endings page.

 

Elden Ring Mending Rune of Perfect Order Notes & Tips

  • Notes & Tips go here

 

 




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    • Anonymous

      The Gods it’s talking about are Marika and her children not the Outer Gods. This mending rune is prevent another shattering from ever occurring and from being tampered with.

      • Anonymous

        After a lot of thought, many of the comments here are totally wrong and about two are correct. Goldmask doesn’t care about himself, through his detachment goldmask never speaks because his listens.

        marika shattered the ring because ranni murdered her favorite son. all this because of two control-hungry women who can’t just let things be how they should. The Greater Will is tired of having basic necessities of life beholden to the whims of men. The Greater Will is punishing marika, radagon and the elden dragon are holding marika in place just long enough to be overcome. The Greater Will gives vision to many seeing the erdtree burned, because it will no longer be needed in the new order. The Greater Will brings back the tarnished because their suffering made them humble and therefore worthy where the “gods” never could be.

        This isn’t even the first time something like this had to happen either. Radagon was originally chosen to be a great, all-encompassing powerhouse so he could be joined to marika. Godwyn was supposed to replace marika. She was already on the way out before ranni’s schemes were even considered.

        Why did even that fail? Because the “gods” are not just fickle like men, they ARE just men. As it is the world had no gods, just belligerent superheroes turned villains. There is no other option than for the Greater Will to step in and take full control instead of just letting things run themselves into the ground.

        For the Good of all, there need to be sacrifices. Goldmask loses his attachment to the world but gains knowledge beyond it. Radagon loses his life but gains a world where we need no more warriors like him. The elden beast is no longer needed because the perfect ring cannot be changed and so can never be put in danger again, so it needs no manifestation.

        The world only believes the Greater Will has forsaken it, when in Reality the Greater Will has rejected the world and demands a new one.

        So what goldmask wants is what the Greater Will wants: to repair the ring then prevent it from ever being changed or damaged again; in the process removing all the terrifying “fantasy” elements of the world and grounding everything. No more super powered pagan-style “gods,” no more magic, no more war, no more manipulation of the most basic tenets of Reality, just the Greater Will and its Church.

        Out goes the strange freemason/alchemic references in regards to how radagon/marika/elden beast and the ring operate in regards to the Greater Will; where there is a “blind watchmaker” who just leaves things be after it Creates. No more need for strange finger creatures or their withered husks to read them; the Greater Will takes things into their own hands directly now.

        In comes a much more Catholic/Aristotelian view as the past is erased. Not shockingly, it was Socrates, Aristotle, And Plato who pointed out that the “pantheon” could not possibly be “gods” but instead they are deimos (dividers, where “demon” comes from) who have hidden us from the real God.

        • Anonymous

          Is this the best ending? Seems like it. The Outer Gods get somewhat screwed over, but not as severely as in the Frenzy Flame ending. It's not like they don't fully deserve either fate.

          • Anonymous

            I think that the Gods the rune is referring to are the Outer Gods. When we mend the Elden Ring with Goldmask rune a golden aura surrounds it as if it were "protecting" it. It influences the whole Order in the same way the Fell Rune defiles the all of it. In Fia's ending the Rune of the Death Prince appears in the lower part of the Elden Ring, meaning it changes only one aspect of the Order, instead of all of it.

            • Anonymous

              As lackluster as this ending's content is, I'm somewhat satisfied with it. For all the nothing he says, Goldmask I think is emblematic of the devoted truthseeker, regardless of faith or origins. He was wholly devoted to his religion, but through rigorous study and contemplation, he came to be aware of its fundamental flaw, that the entropy and shenanigans of the gods (that which causes suffering and legitimate reasons to resist the Golden Order for some life) make them truly no less fickle than men, and that the Golden Order should be reformed to account for this. The real question is what does the Greater Will (an actual real Godlike entity with ambitions) think about this? What about Goldmask's discovery/gestation made his reformed order "Perfect"? Free of suffering? Or is it simply just an acknowledgement? Or did he write a bug fix to the lore and explain that Radagon is Marika? It's not really explained at all, I sincerely hope we get follow-up information in DLC. I really do enjoy the mystical nature of his character, you cant help but hate brother corhyn for abandoning/maybe killing him, likely right before or after Goldmask had his epiphany.

              • Anonymous

                Unlike the other Mending Runes, this one was discovered, not gestated. Given this fact, where could Goldmask have discovered it? He apparently had to go to the forbidden Mountaintops of the Giants to discover it, but there's really no explanation I'm aware of that hints where he found it. Did he find it near the Flame of Ruin? One of the churches? Or was it more of a metaphorical discovery he made from within, possibly gestating it in his own weird metaphysical way?

                • Anonymous

                  You rewrite the Elden Ring and defeat the Elden Beast, the Greater Will is cut off, it can't controll anything without vassals or gods doing its biddings. Goldmask simply removed the divine influence from the Golden Order.

                  They are no better than men afterall...

                  • Anonymous

                    I was annoyed that this ending can really only be done by a high level intelligence mage build. I guess you can respec but that is still a pain if you’ve invested in melee weapons.

                    • Anonymous

                      Goldmask's ending is perfect.

                      Greater Will must be the sole authority of the Golden Order, no fallible gods like Marika/Radagon and petty demigods. Mankind must be beholden to the true Deity.

                      • Anonymous

                        Goldmask's ending is perfect.

                        Greater Will must be the sole authority of the Golden Order, no fallible gods like Marika/Radagon and petty demigods. Mankind must be beholden to the true Deity.

                        • Anonymous

                          I've noticed that many people are unable follow Goldmask's line of logic that leads to him creating this rune. What Goldmask identifies to be the primary problem with the Golden Order is not the fickleness of the demigods, but the "instability of ideology". This instability is what allowed the gods to screw **** up as badly as they did through changing the Golden Order during the shattering of the Elden Ring. As such, Goldmask fixes the Golden Order not by "removing freedom" or "subjugating everyone to the Greater Will" as many people believe, but by making the Golden Order unchangeable. The gods, as well as everyone else, are still as capable of being "fickle" as ever, however they no longer have the ability to change the Golden Order for their own purposes. The mending rune basically a giant "you don't have the right, O you don't have the right" to any attempts of changing the Golden Order, consequently making the Golden Order permanent, stable ideology and fixing what was in Goldmask's opinion its primary problem. Coincidentally, this means none of the outer gods will be able to change the current Golden Order to their own order ever again should they somehow acquire the Elden Ring (including the Greater Will should it ever choose to come back and cause problems), making this ending one of the more permanent ones. So, whether this ending is good or bad ultimately depends on how good you believe the Golden Order to be. Personally, I believe it to be a good thing if we take what the Turtle Pope said about the core of Golden Order as true so I think this is the best ending out of the six.

                          • I believe that Gideon's part in Marika's plan shines a bit of light upon the Perfect Order ending from Goldmask. If Gideon is right, what Marika is planning is to keep the Tarnished struggling in the shattering forever, so that no new vassal to the Greater Will arises as Elden Lord. Goldmask knows that, and he also knows that the shattering has it's cause in the fickle dual nature of Marika/Radagon (that is, one part wanting to shatter the ring and the other trying to fix it). So I believe that Goldmask wants to put all of the power into the Greater Wills' hands, so that Order won't be subject to the fickleness of the gods (as the Mending Rune states). I think his ending is something along those lines because Brother Corhyn rejects Goldmask's idea after he finds out about it, and since the Fundamentalist incantations state that their belief is based on the idea that Marika is a goddess (and probably would never go against the wishes of the Greater Will), if we presume Corhyn is a Fundamentalist, it makes sense that he rejects Goldmask's plan.

                            I'm not sure how the Mending Rune of Perfect Order does that, exactly. Maybe removing the necessity of an Empyrean God, or maybe uniting Radagon and Marika into one thing (truly), or maybe just making the Greater Will all powerful and whatever.

                            • Anonymous

                              People are seriously misunderstanding this ending. Goldmask still supports the Outer God that is the Greater Will. What he is fixing are the lesser gods like Marika and her demi-god offspring. They previously had too much freedom and thus messed up the Golden Order. His ending fixes that by removing that freedom and subjecting them to the Greater Will just as much as the regular people.

                              • Anonymous

                                first:
                                y'all are bloody reformists
                                second:
                                Miyazaki (or the translators) have not read enough Kant to call it a "transcendental ideology" (see item text) and not just a transcendent ideology (whatever that means)

                                • Anonymous

                                  Assuming that the goal is to rid ourselves of control from the outer gods (including the Greater Will) without completely destroying life as we know it, I can't tell wether this ending or Ranni's is the correct choice.

                                  In Ranni's ending, we supposedly remove interference from outer gods by "distancing Order from the Lands Between". But it seems that, for the one thousand years of the Age of Stars, the realm will still be under the guidance of an outside entity (the Moon).

                                  Goldmask's ending is very vague in what it will do to 'perfect' Order. This item mentions that the problem is the "fickleness of the gods". Are outer gods included? Does it mean that all gods (including outer ones like the Greater Will) will be accountable for their actions? Or does it mean that the human gods are fickle and only the Greater Will is worthy of control - therefore ruling the Lands Between and all life in it with an 'iron fist'?

                                  • Anonymous

                                    Guys. I'm sure we've all seen the one video that shows you where to get it and you gotta go past the dragon and blah blah blah, really precise fall onto a railing so you don't die, yada yada. Don't do that. Go to the staircase leading to the boss, and go around to the right of it. No falls necessary. Just walk over. I almost facepalmed when I realized this after walking out this way after dying to the jump once, then getting it.

                                    • Anonymous

                                      I finished this quest and have it in my inventory but there's no option to use it after the last boss, wtf?

                                      • Anonymous

                                        I finished this quest and have it in my inventory but there's no option to use it after the last boss, wtf?

                                        • Anonymous

                                          This is by far the best ending. Goldmask is so brazen and ordered that even the outer gods, including the greater will, are too fickle for him. You establish an elden ring that no outer god can meddle with (unless they re-invade the planet I guess). I think this is what Miquella was trying to do as well with Unalloyed Gold.

                                          • Anonymous

                                            I've acquired the rune even though Corhyn died at Leyndell for me when I burned the Erdtree, it might not be tied to Corhyn at all. (Or he is only needed up until Leyndell.)

                                            • This is essentially the "Reject pantheon. Embrace monotheism" ending. This rune (hypothetically) allows the Golden Order to work autonomously, serving only the Greater Will. By cutting out the needs for flesh and blood gods, the Greater Will can effectively shape the world into its ideal state directly.

                                              • Anonymous

                                                does anyone know if mending the elden ring provides an alternate achievement ending? or if it just gives the "elden lord" one

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